Masher

How to Freeze Cookie Dough in Logs — One Badass Chocolate Chip Cookie

Ingredients we need today for freezing One Badass Chocolate Chip cookies in logs:
4 cups all-purpose unbleached flour
1 t. baking soda (you may use half this amount if you like a denser cookie)
1 t. salt
1 1/2 cups (3 sticks) sweet unsalted butter, softened to room temperature or melted (either way works)
2 cups white sugar
1 cup packed brown sugar
2 T. vanilla extract
2 whole eggs
2 egg yolks
4 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips (or half white chocolate chips and half dark chocolate chips)



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Today we learn how to freeze cookie dough in logs. What’s this about? Click here.

We will be using my recipe for One Badass Chocolate Chip Cookie and if you click the highlighted words, One Badass Chocolate Chip Cookie in this sentence, you’ll see lots of photos of the finished, thick chewy cookies and how to bake them off.

What’s a Badass Cookie? Click here.

I’m going to give instructions for mixing by hand, but you can do this on an electric mixer fitted with a paddle too. The ingredients are listed in the box above.

First, take your chocolate chips, either all semi-sweet or half semi-sweet and half white chocolate mixed together, and place in a bowl. Set it aside.

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Masher

Monet’s Water Lilies

One day left if you want to learn some great cookie baking tips and how to freeze cookie dough in logs with Nancy. What’s this about? Click here.



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Water Lilies by Claude Monet, 1914 - 1926, oil on canvas

Monet’s Water Lilies are on view now at the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan through April 12th. If you’ve never seen these paintings and you live anywhere near NYC, I urge you to do so. Once in a while I like to share something here that is not food but that means a lot to me. This is another of those things.

Judging from the reproductions of the paintings I had seen in books, in person I expected to see ephemeral-looking objects in pastel hues.

I didn’t. What I saw instead were

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Masher

Vintage Wire Egg Baskets

Four days left if you want to learn some great cookie baking tips and how to freeze cookie dough in logs with Nancy. What’s this about? Click here.



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I use a vintage wire egg basket for a centerpiece on my dining room table.

Egg baskets were invented to carry warm, freshly laid eggs safely from hen house to table. The open wire basket allows air to circulate so the eggs cool quickly, keeps them from rolling into each other and prevents cracking. I love the fanciful ones shaped like animals. They make great gifts, especially lined with

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Masher

How to Bake a Great Chocolate Layer Cake

Five days left if you want to learn some great cookie baking tips and how to freeze cookie dough in logs with Nancy. What’s this about? Click here.



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Fudgey Chocolate Layer Cake. Soon you will need one for someone’s birthday. Or for a potluck party. Or maybe just because. I got the recipe for mine from a friend of a friend. What really makes it work though is

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Masher

How to Freeze Cookie Dough in Logs

Our hearts go out to the earthquake victims in Chile. If you would like to help like I did by donating to Habitat for Humanity, click here.



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I’d like to share with you my method for freezing cookie dough in logs. It’s something I learned to do when I was a pastry chef and had to have a large cookie plate of assorted cookies available each evening. I continue this practice now in my home.

Having the dough in frozen logs ready to simply slice and bake is a huge time saver and means you can always have warm cookies from the oven in a pinch. I usually have several different doughs in the freezer. It’s pretty wonderful to open the freezer door and see all the logs of cookie dough in there, ready to be baked off on a moment’s notice.

Recently I ran out, and decided to post how to make and freeze the logs. I’ll feature one dough each week, on Saturdays starting next weekend, so that Jellypress readers can freeze them with me. This is not something hard to do. Just more fun to do it together, and I’ll throw in all my best cookie making tips with the bargain. So this is a freeze-with-me post (and maybe a bake-off-one-or-two-now with me post, since life is best enjoyed to its fullest each moment as the newspapers remind us daily) and a learn-great-cookie-baking-secrets post.

We’ll end up with at least five different doughs to choose from. If you’d like to join in, have the following ingredients ready for next Saturday, March 6:

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Masher

To Knead or Not To Knead

... that is the question. 
Whether it is nobler make a soft wet dough with big rustic holes
following the outrageous artisan craze of the day,
Or to work the arms against glutens and trouble of . . .

For those of you on the no-knead bread bandwagon with me, this is an excellent article by Harold McGee that answers many questions.  I recommend this article to all bread bakers.


Masher

English Spice: A Search for Hot Cross Buns Update

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English spice: too bad I couldn’t just walk into a spice shop and buy some. I love a good spice shop. But rising rents and big corporations have driven them out. Penny candy, tackle for fishing where my grandfather Max used to take me, pickles, handmade jewelry, spices — I remember them all fondly. Exotic treasures, narrow aisles, creaking wooden floors, tinkling bells on the swinging doors. Knowledgeable proprietors. This is what I thought of when I received a comment from food historian Rachel Laudan recommending that I find English spice in response to my last post about my search for a great Hot Cross Buns recipe.

In addition to English spice mix, similar to pumpkin spice in this country, Rachel suggested that I find

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Masher

A China Cap and How to Use It

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This cooking tool is called a China Cap and it was my grandmother’s then my mother’s and now mine.  It is a wonderful tool, used to strain soups and such.  I frequently use it when I make chicken stock.  The pestle helps me press out every drop of liquid from the bones.  But really what this is great at is making a beautiful puree.

You can still buy these at restaurant supply shops.  It is not to be confused with a chinoise, which is more delicate and made of mesh. 

I have this tool for one reason.  That reason is The Red Soup.  And though so many people talk about their grandmother’s recipes, and it begins to get corny, I’m afraid I have to admit it:  yes, this came from my grandmother. 

She was a colorful character.

My grandmother was full of extremes She was rich.  She was poor.  She was abandoned by her mother.  She had an alcoholic father.  She had three husbands, all of whom died on her.  The first—my Irish grandfather—left her a 33 year old widow with nothing.  She got a factory job to support her two kids.  The second husband was an extremely wealthy Italian contractor with big political connections.  She wore mink coats and jewels, and traveled to places like pre-Casto Cuba. 

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Masher

Pastry Brush Update

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Laura and I often talk about how our interest in old recipes is about our passion for history and preservation and not about a false sentimentality or nostalgia for the past. With that in mind, we often find that some kitchen tools with modern improvements made to their designs just do a better job than old ones, however charming. I love my new

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Masher

Vintage Canisters in the Modern Kitchen

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Vintage canisters: Laura and I share a love of them. We don’t want the shiny new, reproduction ones however; we want the dinged-up, scratched and used ones with their gorgeous patina of age that really once sat in somebody’s 1930’s or 1940’s kitchen. One day when I was rhapsodizing about their cool retro colors and shapes, Laura asked me an interesting question. She said,

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Masher

Kitchen Library

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From time to time I like to share something wonderful that is non-food related on Jellypress, and A Book of Luminous Things is in that category. Nobel Prize winner and Professor Emeritus Czeslaw Milosz gathered poems from all over the world into this one volume, translated into English from various languages. One of my favorite poems in the book just happens to be about food and

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Masher

Jerusalem Artichokes

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Yesterday on one of my favorite blogs Ciao Chow Linda I read of her trip to Italy and a wonderful dish she ate with Jerusalem artichokes in it. These are small tubers that are actually not related to the big, fat green artichokes we see in supermarkets everywhere. I was lucky enough to taste Jerusalem artichokes when I was a pastry chef. The chefs I worked for loved them. They really are delicious and worth seeking out.

Linda mentioned in her story that she was curious where to get them in New Jersey and

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Not to be Forgotten

A Search for Hot Cross Buns

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From The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Real Mother Goose
Illustrated by Blanche Fisher Wright, 2004

I am intrigued by Hot Cross Buns. They look delicious. I cannot find a good recipe, however, for making them from scratch. Apparently, few people make them. A lot of childhood memories of them involve cardboard boxes from bakeries or supermarkets. I have a feeling, though, with my baker’s intuition, that the homemade kind would be worth the effort.

Granted I don’t participate in Good Friday traditions, and I only tasted the commercial version once, finding them

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Masher

Broken Dishwasher

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“Should I have bought the more expensive brand?” I asked the repair man. 

It was the seventh visit in four months.

“Nah,” he replied.  “They’re all the same.  I fix them all; they all break. Everything is made of junk.  That’s why we’re in the trouble we’re in.”

Thank you.  I agree.  But what about my dishwasher?

I bought a Whirlpool last spring, and it breaks all the time.  Since October, I have been washing dishes by hand, most of the time. The machine is still under warranty, so rather than replace it, Whirlpool spends twice as much sending in repair men to fix it.  Constantly.  And each time, it breaks again.  Then we wait again another month for a part to come in. 

The machine is clearly a lemon and will never work.

Note: this post is about the second part of our subtitle at Jellypress:  “modern life.” My modern life as a freelance writer and mom means I work more hours than I care to admit in a day.  Dishes are adding more.  Plus a dishrack always on the counter taking space.  Plus a never-ending stack to be washed and another to put away.  I see my son head to the fridge.  “Do you really want that orange juice?” I know it’s another glass in the sink.  Frankly, I am starting to wonder if the Slow Food movement would ever have been born if there weren’t dishwashers.

So, while I’ve got my hands in the water, I have flashbacks to the the 1970s.  I can see the moment the first dishwasher arrived in our house. It was a huge deal.  And I fully understood because I’d been my mother’s dishwashing helper.

“It’s washing the dishes for us!” I declared like it was a miracle. 

“And not only that, I’m sitting here having a cup of coffee,” my mom said, pointing to her cup

Boy that would be nice, wouldn’t it?  Well, of course that’s not what she did with her extra hour each day.

Shortly after that dishwasher came, my mom got a job in town. That job led to another where she worked her way up from a secretary to a high-level manager, and got her bachelor’s degree on the side.  Then she became a vice president, and then consultant. Screw the cup of coffee. While the dishwasher hummed, mom was earning money and education.

One of the reasons why I write about old recipes is that there are good things in the past that should be remembered, used, celebrated.  But washing dishes definitely isn’t one of them.  Hooray for technology. 

Excuse me now, as I’ve got to go call Whirlpool again. 


Masher

Why I Love Cereal For Dinner Sometimes

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One summer when I was a mere youth of 29, I had the good fortune to live in Spain for a month, on the island of Formentera. Goats in the streets. The buzz of motor scooters rounding the dirt roads. No Starbucks. No Banana Republic. Just a big hot sun that set at ten at night, inky espresso and freshly baked fig cakes. It was there that I learned the very healthful European habit of

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Jellypress is about Nancy and Laura having fun with what they love: old recipes, art, and ideas--as we find them in our modern lives.  We met...read more »

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The Lost Ravioli Recipes of Hoboken: A Search for Food and FamilyTo find out about Laura's search for a long lost family recipe, click [ What's a Jellypress?


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Our Books

A Thousand Years Over a Hot StoveA James Beard Award winning book that tells a history of American women through food, recipes, and remembrances. Recipes and illustrations from prehistory to the present day.
To learn more, click [here].


The Lost Ravioli Recipes of Hoboken: A Search for Food and FamilyLaura's memoir about a search for a recipe, happiness, and mythic Italy--with many unexpected adventures along the way.
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Walking on WalnutsIn this culinary memoir, Nancy Ring combines funny and poignant stories of love and work with warm remembrances of a family that celebrates food with gusto and cherishes memories with passion...
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